Posted on

The Daily Flag News—May 2, 2007

Today’s news stories begin with a couple of history lessons, and end with another apartment complex denying tenants the right to fly their American flags. Let’s get right to it.

The only tie-in to flags with this story is the planting of a flag claiming a new land. This map of America, drawn in 1507, is a fascinating look into our past. Doing the quick math, this map is now 500 years old, more than twice as old as the United States.
German chancellor hands over map first naming America | Chron.com – Houston Chronicle

1507-us-map.jpgWASHINGTON — German Chancellor Angela Merkel on Monday officially handed over to the United States the 500-year-old map that was the first to tell the world of a new land it called America.

Library of Congress historians say the world map, completed by German-born cleric and cartographer Martin Waldseemueller in 1507, is the first known document to use the name America — named after Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci — the first to depict the Western Hemisphere and the first to show separate Pacific and Atlantic oceans.

Millions of people, myself included, have a great interest in the WWII Navajo Code Talkers. Their story is a look into their culture and heritage as they served the United States in battle. Stewart Clah was proud to serve his country as a Navajo Code Talker.
Farmington Daily Times – The flag waves on: Family remembers life of passing Code Talker

framington-daily-news.jpgHOGBACK — For seven days and seven nights, Stewart Clah watched over the flag.

As his leaders signed the peace treaty ending World War II, the U.S. Marine and Navajo Code Talker raised and lowered the flag flying on the warship in Pearl Harbor.

“He was proud of that, proud of the American flag,” said his son Darrell Clah, 54, of Hogback.

Monday, a flag flew half-mast outside his sister’s Hogback home. Stewart Clah, 87, of Hogback, died Sunday morning in his sleep.

The flag story was one of the few he told his family about his service. Scarred by his memories of combat, Clah preferred to deflect the spotlight.

“I would ask him, and he’d say, Oh, no, let’s change the subject,'” said his daughter Lena Hayes, 62, of Shiprock.

Even when he was awarded the silver Medal of Honor, Clah treated the honor “like something he had to do,” Darrell Clah said.

The ceremony, filled with so many comrades similar to those who died overseas, may have cut his father too deeply to be enjoyable.

I know that some day in the future these stories of flag flying denials will fade away and be forgotten. Yes, the managers can set “reasonable” boundaries for flying the flag, but they can not ban it completely according to law. The Freedom to Fly the American Flag Act of 2005 covers this situation.
American flag banned from senior apartment complex | KGET

flagban.jpgBAKERSFIELD – The American flag can mean special things to people, and one apartment complex banned the flag from public display recently.

That has its tenants up in arms.

To the folks residing at the apartments, the flag is an emotional extension of who they are, and neighbors agree—getting rid of the flag leaves nobody a winner.

The talk is all abut a new ban at the senior apartment complex as the American flag could be on its way out.

“I think it’s ridiculous, un-American. We have our troops over there fighting and we can’t show our support by flying an American flag?” said Rosemary Bartel, a neighbor. “It’s absolutely ludicrous.”

Neighbors said they feel good when they see Joseph Card’s U.S. Marine Corp flag.

Leave a Reply