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American Flag Dimensions

In 1954, Dwight D Eisenhower sign the United States Flag Code, making it the standard for every aspect of the American Flag. He also added an executive order in 1959 to clarify a few missing components. I find the dimensions for the flag very interesting.

Flags today come in easy to remember sizes, 3X5, 4X6, 5X8, but the flag code clearly indicates that the size ratio for the US Flag is 1:1.9. Let’s do the math for the difference.

Current Flag Sizes

Hoist Fly
3′ 5′
4′ 6′
5′ 8′
10′ 15′

US Flag Code

Hoist Fly
3′ 5.7′
4′ 7.6′
5′ 9.5
10′ 19′

As you can see, the flags we see today are shorter than called for in the code, and the larger the flag, the greater the discrepancy. Seeing a flag with correct dimensions would look funny, because we’re used to seeing these “stubby” flags.

State Flags

Most state flags have the dimensions put forth in their State Flag Code, as well. For instance, the Texas State Flag Code calls for a flag with a ration of 2:3, yet the Texas flags we see today are manufactured to the same dimensions as the current US flag, 1:1.67

4 thoughts on “American Flag Dimensions

  1. […] Code is in laying out the proportions for each component of the U.S. flag. Previously I wrote about the dimensions for length and width of the American flag, but many other details are […]

  2. […] Code is in laying out the proportions for each component of the U.S. flag. Previously I wrote about the dimensions for length and width of the American flag, but many other details are […]

  3. How big is an American garrison flag flown on a US military post?

    1. Mike, thank you for writing. The following is taken directly from the manual Army Regulation 840–10, which I link to The Daily Flag here.

      2–3. Sizes and occasions for display

      a. National flags listed below are for outdoor display.

      (1) Garrison flag—20-foot hoist by 38-foot fly, of approved material. (The post flag may be flown in lieu of the garrison flag.) The
      garrison flag may be flown on the following holidays and special occasions:

      (a) New Year’s Day, 1 January.
      (b) Inauguration Day, 20 January every fourth year.
      (c) Martin Luther King, Jr’s Birthday, third Monday in January.
      (d) President’s Day, third Monday in February.
      (e) Easter Sunday (variable).
      (f) Loyalty Day and Law Day, USA, 1 May.
      (g) Mother’s Day, second Sunday in May.
      (h) Armed Forces Day, third Saturday in May.
      (i) National Maritime Day, 22 May.
      (j) Memorial Day, last Monday in May.
      (k) Flag Day, 14 June.
      (l) Father’s Day, third Sunday in June.
      (m) Independence Day, 4 July.
      (n) National Aviation Day, 19 August.
      (o) Labor Day, first Monday in September.
      (p) Constitution Day and Citizenship Day, 17 September.
      (q) Gold Star Mother’s Day, last Sunday in September.
      (r) Columbus Day, second Monday in October.
      (s) Veterans Day, 11 November.
      (t) Thanksgiving Day, fourth Thursday in November.
      (u) Christmas Day, 25 December.
      (v) Important occasions as designated by Presidential Proclamation or Headquarters, Department of the Army (HQDA).
      (w) Celebration of a regional nature when directed by the installation commander.

      (2) Post flag—8-foot 11 3/8-inch hoist by 17-foot fly, of approved material. The post flag is flown daily except when the
      garrison and storm flags are flown. When a garrison flag is not available, the post flag will be flown on holidays and important
      occasions.

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